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The woman i wanted to be

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The Woman I Wanted To Be by Diane von Furstenberg: Review

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Diane von Furstenberg entered the fashion world in and four years later introduced her famous wrap dress. Her luxury fashion brand, DVF, is now available in more than fifty-five countries all over the world.

Director of the Diller-von Furstenberg Family Foundation, she is an active philanthropist and supporter of emerging female leaders and social entrepreneurs. In , she was named one of the Time Most Influential People. Like Coco Chanel, Diane has always been her own best advertisement.

Diane von Furstenberg is a modern fable of self-invention, fame, wealth, failure, and success that mirrors late-twentieth century America itself. Vogue photographed her wedding. So writes Joseph Abboud, who fell in love with style at five. There in the dark of the movie house, he wasn't just some Lebanese kid with a babysitter. He was the hero, in tweeds and pocket squares. That's where he learned that clothes represented a better life—a life he wanted, and would grab, for himself.

From his blue-collar childhood in Boston's South End to his spread-collar success as one of America's top designers, he has forged a remarkable path through the unglamorous business of making people look glamorous.

He transformed American menswear by replacing the traditional stiff-shouldered silhouette with a grown-up European sensuality. He was the first designer to win the coveted CFDA award as Best Menswear Designer two years in a row and the first designer to throw out the opening pitch at Fenway Park.

He's been jilted by Naomi Campbell who didn't show up on the runway for his first women's fashion show and questioned by the FBI who did show up in his office right after September 11 because he fit the profile. He's soared and sunk more than a few times—and lived to tell the tales.

Threads is his off-the-record take on fashion, from the inside out. With breezy irreverence, he looks at guys and taste, divas and deviousness, fabric and texture, and all those ties.

He takes us to the luxe bastion of Louis Boston, where he came of age and learned the trade, and to the seductive domain of Polo Ralph Lauren, where he became associate director of menswear design. He reveals the mystique of department-store politics, what's what at the sample sale, and who copies whom. He explains the process of making great clothes, from conception and sketch to manufacturing and marketing.

Cheap fashion has fundamentally changed the way most Americans dress. Stores ranging from discounters like Target to traditional chains like JCPenney now offer the newest trends at unprecedentedly low prices.

But what are we doing with all these cheap clothes? And more important, what are they doing to us, our society, our environment, and our economic well-being? Sewing, once a life skill for American women and a pathway from poverty to the middle class for workers, is now a dead-end sweatshop job. The pressures of cheap have forced retailers to drastically reduce detail and craftsmanship, making the clothes we wear more and more uniform, basic, and low quality.

Overdressed will inspire you to vote with your dollars and find a path back to being well dressed and feeling good about what you wear. Filled with gorgeous color photographs of her work, Empress of Fashion: A Life of Diana Vreeland is an elegant and fascinating account of one of the most revered tastemakers of the 20th century.

Account Options Sign in. Top charts. New arrivals. Switch to the audiobook. With remarkable honesty and wisdom, von Furstenberg mines the rich territory of what it means to be a woman.

She opens up about her family and career, overcoming cancer, building a global brand, and devoting herself to empowering other women. Reviews Review Policy. Published on. Flowing text, Original pages. Best For. Web, Tablet, Phone, eReader. Content Protection. Learn More. Flag as inappropriate. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders. More related to fashion design.

See more. Isabel Toledo. Diane von Furstenberg: A Life Unwrapped. Gioia Diliberto. In My Shoes: A Memoir. Tamara Mellon.

Joseph Abboud. Designers are great white sharks, and we roam the waters ourselves. We often pretend to like and admire each other, but sometimes we don't even bother to fake it. The fashion industry is as hardworking, incestuous, and political as any other, and it's virtually impossible, given the size of designers' egos, to sincerely wish someone else well, because behind every false tribute is 'It should have been me. Elizabeth Hawes. After working as a stylist in Paris, Elizabeth Hawes —71 launched one of the first American design houses in Depression-era New York.

Hawes was an outspoken critic of the fashion industry and a champion of ready-to-wear styles. Fashion Is Spinach, her witty and astute memoir, offers an insider's critique of the fashion scene during the s and '30s. Style, she maintains, reflects an era's mood, altering only with changes in attitude and taste. Fashion, conversely, exists only to perpetuate sales.

Hawes denounces the industry's predatory practices, advising readers to reject ever-changing fads in favor of comfortable, durable, flattering attire. Decades ahead of her time, she offers a fascinating and tartly observed behind-the-scenes look at the fashion industry's economics, culture, and ethics. Similar ebooks. Diane: A Signature Life. Diane von Furstenberg. The frank and compelling story of an extraordinary woman and her adventures in fashion, business, and life. Von Furstenberg lived the American Dream before she was thirty, building a multimillion-dollar fashion empire while raising two children and living life in the fast lane.

Her wrap dress, a cultural phenomenon in the seventies, hangs in the Smithsonian Institution; her entry into the beauty business in was as serendipitous and as successful.

Von Furstenberg learned her trade in the trenches, crisscrossing the country to make personal appearances at department stores, selling her dresses and cosmetics. American, daughter of a Holocaust survivor vs. She emerges wiser, stronger, and ever more determined never to sacrifice her passion for life. Dana Thomas. More than two decades ago, John Galliano and Alexander McQueen arrived on the fashions scene when the business was in an artistic and economic rut.

Both wanted to revolutionize fashion in a way no one had in decades. They shook the establishment out of its bourgeois, minimalist stupor with daring, sexy designs. They turned out landmark collections in mesmerizing, theatrical shows that retailers and critics still gush about and designers continue to reference.

Their approach to fashion was wildly different—Galliano began as an illustrator, McQueen as a Savile Row tailor. Galliano led the way with his sensual bias-cut gowns and his voluptuous hourglass tailoring, which he presented in romantic storybook-like settings.

McQueen, though nearly ten years younger than Galliano, was a brilliant technician and a visionary artist who brought a new reality to fashion, as well as an otherworldly beauty. For his first official collection at the tender age of twenty-three, McQueen did what few in fashion ever achieve: he invented a new silhouette, the Bumster.

They had similar backgrounds: sensitive, shy gay men raised in tough London neighborhoods, their love of fashion nurtured by their doting mothers. Both struggled to get their businesses off the ground, despite early critical success. Executives pushed the designers to meet increasingly rapid deadlines. For both Galliano and McQueen, the pace was unsustainable.

In , McQueen took his own life three weeks before his womens' wear show. The corporations had won and the artists had lost. In so doing, she reveals the revolution in high fashion in the last two decades—and the price it demanded of the very ones who saved it. Amy Odell. But first, she has to push her way through the crowds outside and weave her way through the packed venue, from the very back row to the front. And as Amy climbs the ladder with tips about how you can, too , she introduces an industry powered by larger-than-life characters: she meets the intimidating Anna Wintour and the surprisingly gracious Rachel Zoe, not to mention the hilarious Chelsea Handler, and more.

Elizabeth L. Until recently, Elizabeth Cline was a typical American consumer. She was buying a new item of clothing almost every week the national average is sixty-four per year but all she had to show for it was a closet and countless storage bins packed full of low-quality fads she barely wore—including the same sailor-stripe tops and fleece hoodies as a million other shoppers. Amanda Mackenzie Stuart.

Diane von Furstenberg once called Diana Vreeland a "beacon of fashion for the twentieth century. From her career at the helms of Harper's Bazaar and Vogue, to her reign as consultant to the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Vreeland had an enormous impact on the fashion world and left a legacy so enduring that must-have style guides still quote her often wild and always relevant fashion pronouncements.

10 Things We Learned From Diane von Furstenberg’s New Memoir

Diane von Furstenberg has been an iconic face in fashion for over 40 years. Now, in her new memoir , she is sharing what she's learned along the way. The Belgian-born designer and fashion mogul, listed as the 68th most powerful woman in the world , has had quite a life. Born to a mother who survived the concentration camps, had two children with an actual prince, and was taking the fashion world by storm by the time she was in her late 20s.

This copy is for your personal non-commercial use only. In her twenties and thirties, the Princess Diane zu Furstenberg, as she was then known, was a great society beauty. But the sly young princess had a back-up strategy.

This item has sold out. All the books and albums on our site are autographed, so feel free to look around and find another great autographed item! Exclusively Made Available at PremiereCollectibles. One of the most influential, admired, and innovative women of our time: fashion designer, philanthropist, wife, mother, and grandmother, Diane von Furstenberg offers a book about becoming the woman she wanted to be. With remarkable honesty and wisdom, von Furstenberg mines the rich territory of what it means to be a woman.

The Woman I Wanted to Be

By Diane von Furstenberg. One of the most influential, admired, and innovative women of our time: fashion designer, philanthropist, wife, mother, and grandmother, Diane von Furstenberg offers a book about becoming the woman she wanted to be. With remarkable honesty and wisdom, von Furstenberg mines the rich territory of what it means to be a woman. Diane von Furstenberg entered the fashion world in and four years later introduced her famous wrap dress. Her luxury fashion brand, DVF, is now available in more than fifty-five countries all over the world. Director of the Diller-von Furstenberg Family Foundation, she is an active philanthropist and supporter of emerging female leaders and social entrepreneurs. In , she was named one of the Time Most Influential People.

Diane Von Furstenberg Shares Her Philosophy on Aging in an Excerpt from Her New Memoir

Barbara Walters, speaking last month at the celebrity-studded launch party for "The Woman I Wanted to Be," said this about year-old Diane von Furstenberg: "She does what she wants to do, she does it well, and she doesn't give a damn. True as that seems to be, a whole lot of people do give a damn about "DVF," as she and her ever-expanding lines of clothing, shoes, accessories and home goods are known. The Belgian-born designer burst upon the fashion scene in the early s, her career built on a single dress. And what a dress it was: easy to slither into and out of , von Furstenberg's wrap dress sold in the millions, was credited and blamed for contributing to women's sexual and financial freedom, and earned a place in the Smithsonian as a cultural icon of its time.

In her upcoming memoir, The Woman I Wanted to Be, Diane von Furstenberg shares her hard-won philosophy on aging, style, and inner confidence.

Diane von Furstenberg entered the fashion world in and four years later introduced her famous wrap dress. Her luxury fashion brand, DVF, is now available in more than fifty-five countries all over the world. Director of the Diller-von Furstenberg Family Foundation, she is an active philanthropist and supporter of emerging female leaders and social entrepreneurs. In , she was named one of the Time Most Influential People.

THE WOMAN I WANTED TO BE

High-fashion doyenne von Furstenberg Diane: A Signature Life , celebrates a wellspring of wisdom and design inspiration. Addressing the core factors that made her who she is today, von Furstenberg, 67, shares how her familial roots, love life, celebrity and entrepreneurialism all played a part in molding her psyche. Greatly indebted to and influenced by her mother, a Nazi concentration camp survivor, the Belgium-born designer fondly describes her solitary childhood roots growing up in Brussels instilled with the initiative to explore, be free and exercise self-reliance. A bout with cancer in the mids perhaps enhanced her appreciation for a homeopathic lifestyle and a passion for nature, rearing her children and the experience of grandparenting.

Working women get all sorts of advice. Lean in, lean out, ask for a raise, but don't ask in the wrong way. Be aggressive, but not too aggressive. We're also told to make sure not to forget about our personal lives, lest we end up forgoing families or love or travel or friendship in service of our careers. It's confusing and maddening, and we're all still struggling to figure it out. We hope to show that there's no one "right" way to succeed.

The Woman I Wanted to Be Book, Signed Copy

Here are the ten most interesting tidbits. Her mother is a concentration camp survivor. She survived both concentration camps, and even though she came home weighing only 59 pounds, she gave birth the following year to a daughter, Diane. At one point she thought the key to happiness was straight hair. She even admits to ironing it on an ironing board. Her first designer outfit was Pucci.

Dec 18, - Designer Diane von Furstenberg's new memoir is a compelling and personal celebrity biography in "The Woman I Wanted to Be.".

Each copy has been hand signed by Diane herself. Limited quantities available. Accessibility Statement.

Celebrating Diane von Furstenberg’s Memoir, ‘The Woman I Wanted to Be’

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