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Male partner involvement in pmtct

Metrics details. Infant antiretroviral prophylaxis plays an important role towards ensuring the reduction of HIV transmission from mother to child in the postpartum period. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the impact of male partner involvement approaches on the uptake of infant antiretroviral prophylaxis in SSA. Only studies carried out in SSA that reported an approach used in involving male partners and the impact on the uptake of infant antiretroviral prophylaxis irrespective of the Language and date of publication were included.

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Male partner involvement during pregnancy the missing component in PMTCT adherence in Khayelitsha

Box , Debre Tabor, Ethiopia. Box 21, Arba Minch, Ethiopia. Male involvement is an important determinant of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. However, male involvement in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Ethiopia is not well known. To assess male partners involvement in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and associated factors in Arba Minch town and Arba Minch Zuria woreda.

Multistage sampling technique was used and data were collected using interviewer administered standard questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the presence of statistically significant associations between the outcome variable and the independent variables.

Mother-to-child HIV transmission of HIV remains a significant problem in the developing world despite the development and growing availability of effective prevention methods appropriate for resource-limited settings [ 1 , 2 ]. In a previous study, it is observed that the involvement of male partners in antenatal VCT was associated with increased uptake of interventions to prevent vertical and sexual HIV transmission [ 4 ].

Women who received couple counseling did not report an increased risk of adverse social events compared to individually counseled women [ 8 — 10 ]. Dropout among those who have discussed HIV testing with their partners was found to be low in Burkina Faso [ 11 ]. Studies in Kenya found that women accompanied by their partner for HIV testing were three times more likely to return for antiretroviral prophylaxis.

Couple posttest counseling was also associated with an eightfold increase in postpartum follow-up, as well as greater antiretroviral utilization and formula feeding [ 4 , 9 ]. In Uganda male involvement is associated with increased uptake of HIV testing and preventive interventions for vertical and sexual transmissions of HIV [ 12 ].

However no study was conducted on involvement of male partners in PMTCT programs in Ethiopia and particularly in the present study area. Community based study was conducted from February to September There are three hospitals and sixty-eight health centers in Gamo-Gofa zone offering health care services for the total population. The study population was all male partners of reproductive age women 15—49 years who give birth during the previous one year in Arba Minch town and Arba Minch Zuria woreda.

Sample size of was determined by the formula of two population proportion estimations using software Epi-info stat calc. Multistage sampling technique was used. Individual Kebele households having children who are less than one year were then selected using a systematic sampling technique. Data were collected using interviewer administered standard questionnaire.

Individuals who have completed grade 12 were recruited as data collectors and were trained on the data collection procedures. All returned questionnaires were checked for completeness and consistency of responses. Descriptive statistics such as frequencies, proportion, and cross tabulations were used to describe the study population in relation to relevant variables.

Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the strength of associations between the outcome variable and the independent variables. Ethical clearance was obtained from ethical review committee of Arba Minch University and permission was obtained from the respective Kebeles in Arba Minch town and Arba Minch Zuria woreda. Verbal informed consent from each study participant was obtained after clear explanation about the purpose of the study.

Of the respondents included in the analysis, The mean age was 31 years with standard deviation SD of 6. Sixty-five percent of the participants were rural, while the rest were urban. Three hundred fifty-nine The majority of respondents This level of involvement is higher than what is reported from other studies from East Africa [ 10 ].

This difference can be explained by the difference in background of the study participants and the time gap as better attention has been given to male involvement in PMTCT these days. In this study we have found a number of factors associated with male participation in the PMTCT program. Regarding the association of education level with male involvement in PMTCT in this study, those who have education level of above grade 12 were almost four times more likely to be involved in PMTCT than those who do not have education level.

This is in-line with the fact that people that are more knowledgeable could take care of HIV infection, as they easily understood both the transmission and prevention methods. Similar studies in Uganda and elsewhere have found that education level is an important determinant of participation in PMTCT services [ 11 , 13 ].

This is consistent with results of a similar study in Tanzania [ 2 ]. In addition, another study in Tanzania revealed that males were not fully participating in PMTCT programs and reasons given were lack of information and lack of a direct link between PMTCT staff and males [ 6 ].

This study has also shown an association between age and male involvement in PMTCT in that those who are in the age range of 36—55 were almost two times more likely to get involved in PMTCT program than those who are 17—25 years old and this might be due to better understanding of older men on PMTCT than their counterparts.

Being a cross-sectional survey, causality cannot be inferred from these findings and self-report might have also introduced social desirability bias.

The data based on Self-declaration of men without women confirmation may limit our result on the evaluation of male involvement in PMTCT. Marelign Tilahun was investigator and was involved in proposal writing, designing, recruitment and training of supervisors and data collectors, analysis and write-up, and all stages of the project implementation. He did most of the analysis and write-up of the paper.

Shikur Mohamed contributed to the designing of the methodology, recruitment, and training of supervisors and data collectors and was involved in designing of project proposal, design of questionnaires, and supervision and was involved in the final approval of the paper. All authors read and approved the final paper. The authors would like to acknowledge Arba Minch University for granting the fund to undertake this study.

They are also thankful to the leaders of the districts where the study is conducted and male partners who participated in this study. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. We will be providing unlimited waivers of publication charges for accepted articles related to COVID Journal overview.

Special Issues. Received 03 Feb Revised 27 Apr Accepted 24 May Published 03 Jun Abstract Background. Introduction Mother-to-child HIV transmission of HIV remains a significant problem in the developing world despite the development and growing availability of effective prevention methods appropriate for resource-limited settings [ 1 , 2 ].

Methods 2. Study Population The study population was all male partners of reproductive age women 15—49 years who give birth during the previous one year in Arba Minch town and Arba Minch Zuria woreda. Sample Size Determination Method Sample size of was determined by the formula of two population proportion estimations using software Epi-info stat calc. Sampling Procedure Multistage sampling technique was used. Data Collection and Quality Control Data were collected using interviewer administered standard questionnaire.

Data Processing and Analysis All returned questionnaires were checked for completeness and consistency of responses. Ethical Consideration Ethical clearance was obtained from ethical review committee of Arba Minch University and permission was obtained from the respective Kebeles in Arba Minch town and Arba Minch Zuria woreda. Results 3. Sociodemographic Characteristics Of the respondents included in the analysis, Table 1. Sociodemographic characteristics of the study participants in Arba Minch town and Zuria woreda southern Ethiopia, Table 2.

Table 3. References F. Baiden, P. Remes, R. Baiden et al. Msuya, E. Mbizvo, J. Uriyo, B. Stray-Pedersen, N. Sam, and A. Brou, G.

Djohan, R. Becquet et al. Farquhar, J. Kiarie, B. Richardson et al. Bajunirwe and M. Mbizvo, A. Hussain, J. Uriyo, N.

Sam, and B. Medley, C. Garcia-Moreno, S. McGill, and S. View at: Google Scholar J. Orne-Gliemann, P. Tchendjou, M.

Male partner involvement during pregnancy the missing component in PMTCT adherence in Khayelitsha

Metrics details. This study therefore set out to explore the meaning of male partner involvement and propose a definition and theoretical model of this concept in PMTCT in Uganda. Eight focus group discussions and five in-depth interviews were conducted with couples at three public health facilities and community members in the health facility catchment areas in Uganda. The study employed a grounded theory approach underpinned by the pragmatic philosophical paradigm.

The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the efficacy of an invitation card to the male partners as a strategy for MI in PMTCT services by comparing the proportion of pregnant women that were accompanied by their partners between the intervention and the non-intervention study groups. Pregnant women attending antenatal care without a male partner at South Lunzu and Mpemba health centres in Blantyre, Malawi, were enrolled in the study from June to December

Scientific Research An Academic Publisher. Male partner involvement in prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa: Successes, challenges and way forward. Geneva W. Testing and a. Tropical Medicine and International Health, 11,

Box , Dar es salaam. Globally, there are 3. A cross sectional study involving selected health facilities was conducted in Mwanza urban from October through January HIV positive pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic ANC were interviewed using a semi structured questionnaire. Univariate analysis was used to describe the study respondents where bivariate and logistic regression was used to determine predictors of male involvement. Few mothers Mothers who never wanted to be escorted by their male partners and busy partners were associated with reduced odds of male involvement into PMTCT AOR 0. Busy male partners and mothers who did not want to be escorted by their partners were a hindrance to male involvement in PMTCT services. HIV and AIDS continue to be a major public health problem where almost 70 million people have been infected with the Human Immune deficiency Virus and about 35 million people have died of AIDS since the beginning of the epidemic [ 1 ].

Either your web browser doesn't support Javascript or it is currently turned off. In the latter case, please turn on Javascript support in your web browser and reload this page. It creates an opportunity to reverse the transmission of HIV during pregnancy, labor, and breastfeeding. Pre-tested and structured self-administered questionnaires were used to collect the data.

Therefore, to save lives of mothers and their newborn from acquiring HIV, male partners should do their maximum endeavor regardless of any determinant factors as our results revealed its status in our study context and elsewhere at past time too.

Male Partner Involvement in Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission programmes is now strongly advocated as being key in improving infant outcomes. This study was a two-phase, two condition intervention or control longitudinal study as part of a clinic-randomized Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission controlled trial. For Phase 1, female participants were recruited without their male partners.

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Male involvement, the authors add, may be an underutilised public health intervention to address both infant HIV infection and mortality in resource-poor settings. Transmission of an infection from mother-to-baby, during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding. The result of a statistical test which tells us whether the results of a study are likely to be due to chance and would not be confirmed if the study was repeated. All p-values are between 0 and 1; the most reliable studies have p-values very close to 0. A p-value of 0. When a p-value is 0. Confidence intervals give similar information to p-values but are easier to interpret. Expresses the risk that, during one very short moment in time, a person will experience an event, given that they have not already done so.

involvement of male partners in HIV testing is necessary in increasing uptake of interventions for reducing perinatal HIV transmission. The success of PMTCT  by AL Nyondo - ‎ - ‎Cited by 29 - ‎Related articles.

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The low level of male partner involvement in Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV services such as safe infant feeding practices poses a serious challenge to the implementation of guidelines on safe infant feeding and may undermine efforts towards elimination of mother to child transmission of HIV in sub Saharan Africa SSA. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify the approaches that have been utilized to improve male partner involvement in PMTCT services as well as their impact on the uptake of safe infant feeding practices by HIV positive mothers in SSA. Only studies performed in SSA that reported an approach that specifically involved male partners and its impact on the uptake of safe infant feeding practices irrespective of the language and date of publication were included. Odds ratios were extracted or calculated from studies and combined in a meta-analysis using the statistical package Stata version

Javascript is currently disabled in your browser. Several features of this site will not function whilst javascript is disabled. Received 8 October Published 6 March Volume Pages 87—

Box , Debre Tabor, Ethiopia.

About the Author s. The Author s. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Their involvement is critical in the delivery and uptake of maternal healthcare services and improving maternal and child health outcomes. Methods: A qualitative study design, which is exploratory, descriptive and contextual in nature, was used.

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